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آموزش انگلیسی به عنوان زبان دوم

بانک سوالات دبیرستان و پیش دانشگاهی . مکالمه . مقالات . آپدیت روزانه Nod 32

English Idoms
نویسنده : غلامعلی عباسی - ساعت ۱٢:۳۳ ‎ق.ظ روز ۱۳٩٠/۱/۳٠
 

Beck and call

Someone who does everything for you, no matter when you ask, is at your beck and call.

Bedroom eyes

Someone with bedroom eyes has a sexy look in their eyes.

Bee in your bonnet

If someone is very excited about something, they have a bee in their bonnet.

Bee's Knees

If something is the bee's knees, it's outstanding or the best in its class.

Beeline for

If you make a beeline for a place, you head there directly.

Been around the block a few times

Someone who says they've been around the block a few times is indicating that they have life experience relating to the topic at hand. It is not necessary to discuss the introductory aspects of the topic or give beginner level advice.

Been in the wars

(UK) If someone has been in the wars, they have been hurt or look as if they have been in a struggle.

Been there, done that

People say this when they have already experienced what is being discussed.

Beer and skittles

(UK) People say that life is not all beer and skittles, meaning that it is not about self-indulgence and pleasure.

Before the ink is dry

If people make an agreement or contract and then the situation changes very quickly, it changes before the ink is dry.

Before you can say Jack Robinson

The term Jack Robinson represents 'a short amount of time'. When you do something before you can say Jack Robinson, you do it very quickly.

Beg the question

In philosophy "to beg the question" is to assume something to be true that has not yet been proved. I have seen the idiom also to mean that a question is crying out to be asked.

Beggars can't be choosers

This idiom means that people who are in great need must accept any help that is offered, even if it is not a complete solution to their problems.

Behind bars

When someone is behind bars, they are in prison.

Behind closed doors

If something happens away from the public eye, it happens behind closed doors.

Behind someone's back

If you do something behind someone's back, you do it without telling them.

Behind the eight ball

A difficult position from which it is unlikely one can escape.

Behind the times

Someone that is behind the times is old-fashioned and has ideas that are regarded as out-dated.

Believe in the hereafter

A belief in the hereafter is a belief in the afterlife, or life after death. It is, therefore, associated with religions and the soul's journey to heaven or to hell, whichever way being just deserts for the person based on how they led their life.

Bell the cat

To bell the cat is to perform a difficult or impossible task.

Bells and whistles

Bells and whistles are attractive features that things like computer programs have, though often a bit unnecessary.

Bells on

(USA) To be somewhere with bells on means to arrive there happy and delighted to attend.

Belly up

If things go belly up, they go badly wrong.

Below par

If something isn't up to standard, or someone isn't feeling or doing very well, they are below par.

Below the belt

If someone says something that is cruel or unfair, it is below the belt, like the illegal punches in boxing.

Belt and braces

(UK) Someone who wears belt and braces is very cautious and takes no risks.

Belt and suspenders

(USA) Someone who wears belt and suspenders is very cautious and takes no risks.

Bend over backwards

If someone bends over backwards, they do everything they can to help someone.

Bend someone's ear

To bend someone's ear is to talk to someone about something for a long-enough period that it becomes tiresome for the listener.

Benjamin of the family

The Benjamin of the family is the youngest child.

Bent as a nine bob note

(UK) A person who is as bent as a nine bob note is dishonest. The reference comes from pre-decimalisation in UK (1971), when a ten shilling (bob) note was valid currency but no such note as nine shillings existed.

Beside the point

If something is beside the point, it's not relevant to the matter being discussed or considered.

Beside themselves

If people are beside themselves, they are very worried or emotional about something. 

Beside yourself

If you are beside yourself, you are extremely angry.

Best of a bad bunch

The best that could be obtained from a list of options that were not exactly what was required.

Best of both worlds

If you have the best of both worlds, you benefit from different things that do not normally go together.

Best thing since sliced bread

If something is the best thing since sliced bread, it is excellent. ('The greatest thing since sliced bread' is also used.)

Bet your bottom dollar

(USA) If you can bet your bottom dollar on something, you can be absolutely sure about it.

Better half

Your better half is your husband or wife.

Better late than never

This idiom suggests that doing something late is better than not doing it at all.

Better safe than sorry

This idiom is used to recommend being cautious rather than taking a risk.

Better than a kick in the teeth

If something is better than a kick in the teeth, it isn't very good, but it is better than nothing.

Better than a stick in the eye

If something is better than a stick in the eye, it isn't very good, but it is better than nothing.

Better the devil you know

This is the shortened form of the full idiom, 'better the devil you know than the devil you don't', and means that it is often better to deal with someone or something you are familiar with and know, even if they are not ideal, than take a risk with an unknown person or thing.

Between a rock and a hard place

If you are caught between a rock and a hard place, you are in a position where you have to choose between unpleasant alternatives, and your choice might cause you problems; you will not be able to satisfy everyone.

Between the devil and the deep blue sea

If you are caught between the devil and the deep blue sea, you are in a dilemma; a difficult choice.

Between you and me and the cat's whiskers

This idiom is used when telling someone something that you want them to keep secret.

Beyond a shadow of a doubt

If something's beyond a shadow of a doubt, then absolutely no doubts remain about it.

Beyond belief

If people behave in such a way that you find it almost impossible to accept that they actually did it, then you can say that their behaviour was beyond belief.

Beyond our ken

If something's beyond your ken, it is beyond your understanding.

Beyond the black stump

(AU) An Australian idiom idicating that even if you go as far as you can, the black stump is still a little further.

Beyond the pale

If something's beyond the pale, it is too extreme to be acceptable morally or socially.

Big Apple

(USA) The Big Apple is New York.

Big bucks

If someone is making big bucks, they are making a lot of money.

Big cheese

The big cheese is the boss.

Big Easy

(USA) The Big Easy is New Orleans, Louisiana

Big fish

An important person in a company or an organisation is a big fish.

Big fish in a small pond

A big fish in a small pond is an important person in a small place or organisation.

Big girl's blouse

A person who is very weak or fussy is a big girl's blouse.

Big hitter

A big hitter is someone who commands a lot of respect and is very important in their field.

Big nose

If someone has a big nose, it means they are excessively interested in everyone else's business.

Big picture

The big picture of something is the overall perspective or objective, not the fine detail.

Big time

This can be used to with the meaning 'very much'- if you like something big time, you like it a lot.

Bigger fish to fry

If you aren't interested in something because it isn't important to you and there are more important things for you to do, you have bigger fish to fry.

Bird in the hand is worth two in the bush

'A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush' is a proverb meaning that it is better to have something that is certain than take a risk to get more, where you might lose everything.

Bird's eye view

If you have a bird's eye view of something, you can see it perfectly clearly.

Bird-brain

Someone who has a bird-brain, or is bird-brained, is stupid.

Birds and the bees

If a child is taught about the birds and the bees, they are taught about sex.

Birds of a feather flock together

This idiom means that people with similar interests will stick together.